Please feel free to contact me if you have questions that go beyond the answers found here. I'll do my best to help!

Tillandsia “air plants” are very easy to care for as long as you understand their needs. They don’t ask for much. They can even bloom and reproduce over time with very little attention.

Light:

A room with bright morning or afternoon light is best. They do not need full sunlight; in fact, a bright sunny window can prove to be too harsh, burning the leaves.

Temperature:

Air plants do not like freezing temperatures. For this reason, if you have your display hung outside, or in a screened porch, it is best to bring it inside during the winter. Aside from that, they are extremely tolerant.

Watering:

The advice on watering tillandsias is greatly varied. I have tried it all, and found that the best solution is to submerge your plant in a bowl of water for an hour, once a week. Once you have done this, it’s very important to gently shake the water out of the leaves. The major cause of air plant “mortality” is when they get water sitting in the base of the plant, causing rot. I shake out my plants, then rest them upside down on a towel for an hour or so, to ensure that all the water has drained out. 

 

That’s it! Set an alarm to help you remember to water once a week, and remember that air plants need sunshine to process the water they have soaked up. Both are important components to a happy and healthy air plant!

There’s good news….you CAN succeed with succulents (despite your self professed black thumb). Just follow these instructions!

 

Light:

Succulents need sunshine!! That being said, too much sun can bake any plant. Ideally, they love a window that gets bright morning or afternoon sun, not all day rays. If your plant is not getting enough light, it will begin to stretch taller, looking for more sun. If this starts to happen, you can either move it to brighter light or turn it once a week to keep its shape uniform.

 

Watering:

The most common problem succulents face is over watering. I water my plants once a week in the summer, and scale back to once every two weeks in the winter, when the light is weaker and growth has slowed. 

 

Rule of thumb: always let the soil go totally dry before watering again. 

 

Pruning: 

If succulents don’t get enough light, you will start to see them stretching towards the sun. Maybe you like this “leggy” look (it can be cool to let them go wild). If that’s not your style, I suggest pruning. With a sharp knife or pair of scissors, snip the head of the plant off along with a bit of stem. Be brave! You are not killing your plant! Once you have taken the clipping, leave it lying out of the soil for two days, so the cut can dry (very important). After this is complete, you can put the cutting stem side down into a pot of fresh soil. It will start to root within a week or two!

 

One last note….

Some people (like myself) have a horrible memory when it comes to watering their houseplants. I find that keeping an alarm on my computer or phone has helped me immensely. I set it to remind me while making coffee or getting ready for my day. 

 

 

Cacti Care:

 

Light:

Cacti love the sun. There’s a reason they grow in the desert! That being said, any plant can get baked by too much sun coming through a window. They love bright afternoon or morning light. 

 

Watering:

The most common problem cacti face is over watering. Like, seriously, these fellas need about a half a teaspoon of water once every two weeks. When winter comes around and the light is weaker and the days are shorter, I scale that back to once every three weeks. 

 

Rule of thumb: always let the soil go totally dry before watering again. 

 

Cacti are super slow-growing, but I love that, because the cute little cactus friend that you brought home will remain looking good in his pot on your windowsill for a long, long time with proper care. 

 

All of my plants and their pots have been carefully grown and designed to make a beautiful addition to your home. Enjoy!

A word about candles:

 

When I started experimenting with candle making, I knew that I wanted a clean burning, softly scented candle that would provide ambiance in my home. After much testing, I am happy with the results of a 100% soy wax. I researched many different fragrance options, but ended up blending all natural essential oils to guarantee an authentic and pure scent. 

 

Keeping the wick trimmed will keep your candle burning cleanly. If the glass gets a light film of soot on it (this occasionally happens with the larger candles due to the smaller opening), wait until the wax has completely cooled, then wipe the inside of the glass with a paper towel. (I wrap a spoon in a paper towel to reach inside the jar). 

 

Remember, never leave burning candles unattended! 

With regards to events and floral design, I am very careful with my choices. I love working with creative, collaborative clients who come to me looking for the style I am known for. I only take on one client at a time, and that means that they have my full attention and dedication during the time leading up to their event. 

For more information and pricing, drop me a line!

My love for concrete has evolved over time to include dishes and vases suitable for everyday use. These pieces take weeks to produce, and are sealed with a food safe, waterproof sealant. As with any fine pottery, treat these with care. In terms of washing, simply wipe out with a damp cloth.